Appliance Repair Blog

Thoughts and commentary about appliance repair topics including common failures and repairs, plus links to frequently used parts, industry news, along with information to help you better understand your appliances. Resources available for the technical professional and the do-it-yourselfer.

Over 650 Posts


Model #WFW9400SW00icon, this front load washer had been working just fine for the customer, but when it came time to use it recently, nothing would work. When the power button was pressed, the unit would beep twice, but nothing in the display illuminated. None of the other buttons seemed to do anything when pressed, with the exception of the lock button would lock the controls.

Error codes, or fault codes as they are sometimes called are a nice feature found on many of the newer electronic based appliances. They have the ability to kind of self diagnose problems when they arise, and can help find problems before they become larger issues. These error messages really only have one drawback. And that is knowing what the various codes for each machine is trying to tell us.

Now understand, appliances have been using codes for some time, but there is little if any standardization as the codes change for each manufacturer and even change depending on the model from the same manufacturer. Oftentimes the information is available in the tech sheet, which should be located somewhere in the unit, but this isn't always true. So if all else fails, I suggest using this thing called the Internet. Just be aware, about half of the information you find is good, while the other half, well lets say it is less than accurate. How to separate the two is part of the reason I right these posts. But I digress.

Because the washer wouldn't do anything, the F70 code would not display, but instead I found it logged in the units memory. I was able to find it by putting the washer into a diagnostic mode, something else that's found in the tech sheet, and instead of running through a test cycle, I simply got the F70 in the display.

According to the tech sheet, and the trusty Internet, the F70 is a communication error between the user interface board, and the main control board. These two boards talk to each other each time a button is pressed, or an indicator light turns on or off. To make sure each board is working properly, they have a heartbeat that keeps each board in sync with each other. It's when this heartbeat stops that the problems begin.


The suggestion from the tech sheet is to remove power, then see what happens. If that doesn't work, check all the electrical connections, by the way these are normal checks for any suspected electrical problem. If the problem still exists, replace one of the control boards. Which one you replace is usually based on other observations and experience because there really isn't a field test available to narrow down the failure to a specific board.

This is why you may find a technician that visits your home for a repair armed with multiple parts. It's not because they don't know what they are doing. But more likely to do with the manufacturer not providing us with the proper information to know which board has failed. With new technology comes new trouble shooting headaches.

The telling story on this machine was it wouldn't even work in diagnostics, which is an indication the failure is more likely the control board than the display board. And after installing the new control boardicon, a press of the power button illuminated the display confirming my diagnosis. The washer was up and running, and ready for use.



Presented by - All Tech Appliance Service, your Portland Oregon appliance repair company. We service many brands of refrigerators, washers, dryers, ranges, dishwashers, freezers, ovens and microwaves including popular brands like Whirlpool, Kenmore, Maytag, Frigidaire, Amana, GE, Jenn Air, Ikea, Sears, Estate, Roper, Electrolux, KitchenAid, Fisher & Paykel and more. We also provide preventative appliance maintenance, dryer vent cleaning, replacement appliance installation, and property management appliance service. Visit us online at www.AllTechAppliance.com

3 comments:

R. O'Donnell said...

Wow! I am an appliance retail sales person, and often get questions from customers about problems with new hi-tech appliances. Your explanations are easy to understand, and a great help. Keep up the good work!

Anonymous said...

I've had all the boards replaced including the front buttons of my machine and I am still getting an F70 error code. I unplug the machine & I'm ready to do more laudry, very annoying though. I have also have had a problem since the machine was brand new is the water runs thru and dumps the rinse in during the wash cycle.

Anonymous said...

My Whirlpool Duet dryer decided today (after about 3 years) to stop working displaying the F70 fault code. Coincidentally, after having two power outages in our area the day before. Unplugging and replugging unit made no difference.

After reading the blogs, I removed the bottom front panel (4 bolts down near the floor hold it in place) and found, attached to the removed panel, a SCHEMATIC / trouble shooting instruction sheet...Vacuumed entire interior, removed and reconnected all front connectors, opened top and did the same on the upper controls....and VOILA...working dryer...

Blog Widget by LinkWithin